Create a custom look with chicken wire glass

apartmentFrom coastal California homes to Pulino’s restaurant in the Bowery district of Manhattan, vintage chicken wire glass is being used as a design element in a number of creative and unique ways.

Originally manufactured to provide durability, stability and security to industrial or commercial buildings such as schools and fire stations, this industrial grade glass has a network of wire molded into it, making it strong and shatter resistant.

In addition, the variety of netting shapes and glass textures make chicken wire a versatile design choice, especially if you want to evoke a nostalgic feel or country theme in your home. Choose from clear, textured, pebbled or hammered glass and a wormy, square or hexagonal netting design.

Savvy homeowners are using this glass in almost every room of the house. Whether your style is Country French, Classic White or Modern/Industrial, you can create a one-of-a-kind custom kitchen using chicken wire glass. Show off your crystal or copper cookware by replacing solid cupboard doors with glass. Design an open and airy pantry with chicken wire glass doors. The effect works well on curio hutches and china cabinets in the dining room too.

starbucks2Carry the look into the living room, family room or office. Protect your books, TV, stereo equipment and keepsake decorative items by using chicken wire glass doors on your shelves. The wine cellar is a natural for this beautiful glass.

And think about adding chicken wire glass doors to the cabinet above the bathroom toilet.

To let light into your home while sustaining privacy, consider using chicken wire glass on your French doors or skylights. This type of glass is a sturdy and wise choice for patio or balcony enclosures. We’ve even seen a vintage barn that incorporated chicken wire glass doors.

On the commercial side, Starbucks in New York City uses chicken wire glass panels as space dividers. Cata Restaurant in Manhattan’s Lower East Side features a patchwork of chicken wire glass textures in their exterior windows, while The Arlington Club on the Upper East Side has an atrium skylight and soffit above the bar made with pebbled chicken wire glass.

The Acqua Al 2 restaurant in Washington, D.C., uses hammered chicken wire glass to cover storage areas. Its casement windows are also made from a patchwork of chicken wire glass of various textures.

One Manhattan apartment created a canopy with salvaged corrugated chicken wire glass, while the Diane von Fustenburg showroom designed an unusual awning with corrugated chicken wire glass retrieved from the Philadelphia Naval yard.

Ready to try some in your next renovation or building project? Olde Good Things carries a wide variety of vintage chicken wire glass: clear, pebbled, hammered, ribbed, wormy square, aqua pebbled or textured. We can cut your order to size. A cutting fee may be applicable depending on order size. Samples are available upon request.

Aqua pebbled
 Amber Corrugated
Textured Chicken Wire

Ribbed Chicken Wire
Wormy Chicken Wire
Clear Chicken Wire

Things to know about ordering vintage glass:

  • The wire twists in chicken wire glass run top to bottom, the direction of the height. When requesting a quote please provide your dimensions as width x height.
  • With all our glass products, we can do cut-outs, drill holes and cut to your template patterns. Templates must be provided in a rigged material.
  • All our glass is reclaimed vintage material, and most has been used, so expect signs of age from exposure to weather and use.
  • Minimum order $300.
  • Samples are available.

 

 

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What is corrugated glass?

Amber Corrugated Glass
Corrugated glass Awning

Corrugated glass is one type of industrial and commercial glass that was once used almost exclusively in factories. Because of its strength, and ability to diffuse light and shadow to help increase privacy and security, it was in high demand during the early industrial revolution.

Corrugation is a form of folding that can add strength and stability to cardboard boxes, flexibility and drainage to metal awnings and roofs, and light refraction and diminished visibility to glass. Corrugated boxes, metal, and glass can bare heavier loads, and corrugated glass is thicker and more shatter resistant than regular flat glass of the same height and length.

In 1926, a United States patent was awarded to Walter Cox and Arno Shuman of the Philadelphia Wire Glass Company for the process that makes corrugated glass. The process of making corrugated glass is as follows:

·         Place a crimped sheet of wire netting on a lengthwise corrugated table.

·         Corrugate the sheet of wire by passing over it a corrugated roll.

·         Embed the sheet of wire in the center of a corrugated sheet of glass by rolling the sheet of corrugated glass along the table, holding the netting, with the roller.

Fortunately, there is also some information contained within the patent that gives us some details about what makes corrugated glass so special.

Corrugated Glass AwningAccording to US Patent US1156214 A, “Evidently the sheet is possessed of great mechanical strength. The distance from center to center of the corrugations is considerable and may be measured by saying that it is at least three times the thickness of the glass.” The patent also states that because a sheet of chicken wire mesh is pressed between each sheet of glass, the glass is thick but flexible which makes it ideal for use in industrial settings.

This glass is one-of-a-kind and because it was only made during the height of America’s industry period, the original, high quality corrugated glass is no longer in production. That means that every piece of corrugated glass made is a rare, high demand home décor item that can only be purchased from salvage experts who have the experience to safely and carefully remove the glass, the room to store the glass, and the skill and creativity to repurpose the glass into new glass panes, decorative pieces, tables, partitions, awnings, or anything else they can think of. One such salvage company is Olde Good Things.

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Visit us at the fall High Point Market

At this very moment Olde Good Things is featuring our Altered Antiques at the High Point Spring Market Trade Show. The show began October 19, 2013 and will continue until the 24th. So come by and see the true beauty of our pieces in person. This show is open to the trade only.

Olde Good Things is located Booth I-528 & I-540

The Suites At Market Square

200 West Commerce Avenue

High Point NC 27260-4908

Get directions

High Point Market ‘First time to the Market resource

 

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Madison Grand Opening Event

THANK YOU FOR COMING!!!

We would like thank each of you that could make it to our Grand Opening Walk-Through Event last Thursday, October 8th. We ate, drank, took funny pictures together, and most importantly celebrated the opening of our 5TH STORE IN MANHATTAN.

If you were not able to make it do not worry! We will be hosting more events like this one in the near future just stay tuned to our email alerts. For now enjoy the pictures above and please keep in touch by visiting one of our seven stores nationwide.

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Grand Opening of our Madison Avenue store

madison_grand_openingCome on down to the grand opening of our new Madison Avenue store next Thursday, Oct. 3, starting 7:30 pm through 9:30 pm. Everyone is saying it’s our best looking store so far (and we agree). This store has a unique mix of breathtaking chandeliers, Belgium mirrors,  elegant vintage furniture, furnishings and other unusual items you won’t find anywhere else. Open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, 212-321-0770, at the corner of 32nd Street.

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New collection of Mid-Century chandeliers

This gallery contains 6 photos.

If you have had a chance to visit our recently opened Madison Avenue location you may have noticed our new collection of Mid-Century chandeliers. For years we have been complimented on our wide variety of lighting with the exception of … Continue reading

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Showing love: Reusing vintage hardware

They all say that the devil’s in the details, but for those brave enough to venture into the world of details, there will be due reward. Creativity is at the epicenter of any beautifully-decorated room. Not only are there a plethora of ways to use vintage hardware pieces for their intended purpose and draw more beauty into a room, but finding alternative uses could also enliven a space and give it a unique flair that won’t be found elsewhere.

Turn vintage hardware pieces into wall hangings for decoration. Sticking a random door hinge in the middle of a wall won’t exactly do the trick, but grouping a few different hardware pieces could give the desired effect. Get an old window pane and hang it with pieces of hardware creatively placed in opposing panes of the window. Take an assortment of locks and offset them with skeleton keys for an artistic arrangement of vintage hardware.

l198557 (Custom)
l199024 (Custom)
l198569 (Custom)

Think outside designed purpose to find creative ways of repurposing. Doorknobs can have a lot in common with many wall-mounted coat hangers. Take a salvaged piece of wood and stick old doorknobs to it, and voila! you have your own one-of-a-kind coat hanger for your entry way. Don’t let the original function of an item hang you up. It’s likely that thinking outside the box will result in a much more creative result. Seeing only a device for opening doors will cripple creative flow. Consider the shape, size, weight, texture, and unique qualities of an item. What makes it special? How can its best features be showcased?

k193303 (Custom)
l198451 (Custom)
k193307 (Custom)

Let creativity be your guide. When something brings back pleasant memories or fits well with a room motif, don’t let it get away! It’s not the same as playing in the world of made-to-order items. These aren’t going to be remade for people who sit on their hands and watch a good thing pass them by. Why not use a door-knocker as a drawer pull? How about turning some lock plates into a lamp shade? Find some doorknob plates and make them into a table top, or use them to cover a half-wall that used to have ugly, fake wood paneling on it.

Look for things that really shine for you and make them part of your home. A home can speak volumes about the one who owns it. Don’t let the conventional uses for old items keep you from seeing potential outside the box.

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The Tale of the Madison Avenue Chalkboard

See some pictures of our new store here.

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How to install antique and vintage doorknobs

k193204-05 (Custom)As the #1 ranked architectural salvage company in the country, we are overflowing with incredible vintage and antique goods. One of our most popular salvaged pieces are vintage and antique doorknobs. We have beautiful honeycomb type mercury dot antique doorknobs circa 1800s, we recently salvaged a collection of milk glass vintage doorknobs, and there are a number of deliciously antique Victorian ‘Loraine’ door knobs just waiting for you to come and take them home.

If you are lucky enough to find the perfect a set of antique or vintage doorknobs at one of our locations you might be at a loss as to how to install them properly on your own (most people are understandably ignorant in antique hardware installation). Well, in order to please our esteemed customers we are offering you this how-to blog post so that you can learn how to install your own doorknobs.

Most antique doorknobs are similar in their mechanisms which means that this installation method will work on most of the doorknobs you’ll find in our stores. These how-to instructions are for antique doorknobs with two glass top knobs and a connecting spindle – you’ll also need a backplate or rosette (we have a great selection of those as well) and a mortise latch, purchased from a local hardware store.

Vintage door knob screw

  • The connecting rods on the glass top doorknobs are usually the threaded type with screws the base of each knob. These screws are there to keep the knobs in place. Using a flat head screw driver, loosen and then remove the screws on one side of the rod until you are able to twist one of the knobs from the rod.
  • Remove the knob from one end of the rod. If the rod is rusted into the base of the knob you can use a set of pliers to loosen and then remove the rod.
  • Using manufacturer instructions, install the mortise latch in your door. This is a special latch that allows you to install antique and vintage knobs with square spindles into modern doors.
  • Place your chosen backplate or rosette on one side of the door and insert the rod through the backplate and mortise latch and out the other side of the door. Do not screw the backplate on yet, you will do this once the knob has been reattached to the rod.
  • Reattach the glass top antique doorknob to the other side of the rod. Replace the screws and tighten until knob functions without wiggling.
  • Screw the backplate onto each side of the door.

Voila! You have installed your own antique or vintage doorknob! Don’t you feel accomplished? Antique doorknobs are meant to be admired. They are functional, but they are also showpieces and conversation starters. Our wide selection of salvaged doorknobs offers our customers the ability to mix and match their collections so they can design doors that set off the décor of the room even before guests enter them.

If, after reading this blog post, you are still unsure about how to install your doorknob, feel free to contact us, or visit one of our locations and speak with one of our staff.

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Olde Good Things spotlight: Boulton & Watt — Emporium Design’s dream build

The industrial revolution marked a huge change in history; the beginning of an exciting journey into an era filled with growth. This new era meant change, change in how things were manufactured, and the speed at which they were completed. Every aspect of life would change and improve as hand production moved to machine production increasing productivity and efficiency. The transition from hand production to machine began in Great Britain, and over a few decades made its way to the United States. This move boasted an improvement in water power, the increase in steam powered production, and the creation of machine tools.

When pondering over this time period, the 18th and 19th century’s images of large machines operated by steam may come to mind. Large, bulky and metal might be a few adjectives that could describe this era, but not words such as beautiful, unique, full of ambiance and creativity. Though one may not consider the industrial age to be a thing of beauty, one’s opinion may change upon entering Boulton & Watt in Manhattan, NYC.

This historic Manhattan building has been home to several industrial businesses over the decades, but now it is home to a restaurant that honors and beautifies the industrial era – Boulton & Watt.

This historic Manhattan building has been home to several industrial businesses over the decades, but now it is home to a restaurant that honors and beautifies the industrial era – Boulton & Watt.

This sign is a beacon to those who love amazing food and want to be wowed by their surroundings while they eat. Boulton & Watt will give them both.

This sign is a beacon to those who love amazing food and want to be wowed by their surroundings while they eat. Boulton & Watt will give them both.

Boulton & Watt is a restaurant full of history and charm that can be found on a prominent East Village corner in Manhattan New York. The history behind the building in which Boulton & Watt resides dates back to the 19th century when the industrial revolution was making its mark in history. Before Boulton & Watt took over occupancy, the building was once known as the neighborhoods working factory and engine repair shop. Love and gratitude for this remarkable era is obvious to guests upon entrance to the restaurant. The rich history of the industrial era was carefully kept intact by the creative minds at Emporium Design.

Emporium Design prides themselves on being a forward thinking design-build firm that specializes in creating unique spaces that complement the mind, ideals, and heart of each of their clients. Those looking to hire a design team that is not bound by in-the-box thinking are drawn to the Emporium Design firm. The goal of this company is to help create a lasting impression for everyone who enters one of their client’s buildings, and that is true of those who walk into Boulton & Watt.

The image is the perfect complement to the wood and steel footrest stools, and various machine base table legs Olde Good Things provided for this design/build project.

The image is the perfect complement to the wood and steel footrest stools, and various machine base table legs Olde Good Things provided for this design/build project.

The wall art is 'geared' towards the theme.

The wall art is ‘geared’ towards the theme.

Walking into Boulton & Watt is like taking a trip into the past. The Emporium Design Firm wanted to preserve this building’s deep and prolific history, and so they designed the restaurant’s theme around the look, feel and history of the building. In order to achieve a complete industrial feel the Emporium Design team needed a little help. They had the ideas, the dreams, and the vision, but they also needed the design elements and materials to bring those dreams to life.  We are one of the largest architectural antique dealers in the country specializing in historical artifacts from the nineteenth century and the pre-depression era. This makes us a popular choice for design projects such as the amazing design and build of Boulton & Watt. Part of the unique experience of eating at Boulton & Watt is sitting amongst, and literally on, history; history that has been gathered and displayed beautifully thanks to the keen eye of those that work for us, and the effort they place in locating and repurposing all kinds of antique items.

The bar is where everyone seems to gather, and when that bar is in Boulton & Watt, it’s easy to see why; the distressed mirrored glass, and the gears that turn an Olde Good Things salvaged ceiling fan add a taste of the Machine Age.

The bar is where everyone seems to gather, and when that bar is in Boulton & Watt, it’s easy to see why; the distressed mirrored glass, and the gears that turn an Olde Good Things salvaged ceiling fan add a taste of the Machine Age.

The image is the perfect complement to the wood and steel footrest stools, and various machine base table legs Olde Good Things provided for this design/build project.

The image is the perfect complement to the wood and steel footrest stools, and various machine base table legs Olde Good Things provided for this design/build project.

Industrial, adjustable singer stools are just one of the reclaimed items from Olde Good Things that can be found in Boulton & Watt. Wood and steel footrests compliment a uniquely fashioned table designed and put together from various machines that are true to the era being honored. Throughout the restaurant one can see little touches salvaged by Olde Good Things such as the glass behind the bar, which boasts a lovely distressed mirror and helps add a dash of industrial flavor from an earlier time period. The Emporium Design team left no space untouched by history, to be true to the restaurant theme.

The gizmo gears in the picture actually turn a large ceiling fan.

The gears behind the bar are rigged…

The gizmo gears turn a large unique ceiling fan.

… to turn a large salvaged ceiling fan.

These mint green urinals are one of the quirkiest things Olde Good Things has salvaged. Not only do they have practical use, they are pleasing to the eye.

These mint green urinals are one of the quirkiest things Olde Good Things has salvaged. Not only do they have practical use, they are pleasing to the eye.

Doorknobs, decorative iron, mantels and even salvaged urinals are just part of the unique items OGT has reclaimed and repurposed; when the designers at Emporium Design needed to complete the look and feel of the bathroom at this industrial themed eatery they knew they would find what they were looking for at Olde Good Things. To truly accomplish a task as grand as an industrial themed eatery, it takes multiple individuals, teams, and specialist, to pull off such a feat; the people at Emporium Design and Olde Good Things accomplished their goal beautifully. Those that have the unique privilege of eating at Boulton & Watt would all agree that the atmosphere and décor reminds them of an exciting time in America’s history.

 

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